up to funding
[wiki.git] / talks / 2020 / fosdem-advancing-science-with-dataverse.mdwn
1 On February 2nd, 2020 I gave a talk at FOSDEM called "Advancing Science with Dataverse."
2
3 The talk is on [YouTube][] and my [slides][] are available on the FOSDEM website.
4
5 [YouTube]: https://twitter.com/philipdurbin/status/1224245828971388930
6 [slides]: https://fosdem.org/2020/schedule/event/dataverse/
7
8 Thank you, everyone, for coming. Again, my name is Philip Durbin. I'm a software developer at Harvard University. This is a picture of our campus. We're across the river from Boston in the United States. I'm here to tell you about Dataverse.
9
10 Dataverse is a community of data enthusiasts, specifically research data. That means that we are scientists, researchers, and often we come from the academic library world, so librarians and data curators, data scientists, software developers like myself.
11
12 These are some pictures from our annual gathering in Cambridge, Massachusetts. We have our sixth annual Datavers Community Meeting this June and everyone welcome to come. We always play what we call soccer.
13
14 For importantly for FOSDEM, Dataverse is open source software. We are Apache licensed. There are 52 installation of Dataverse around the world across six continents. It has been translated into ten languages and there is an opportunity to contribute there, for sure.
15
16 Here are some stats from GitHub for our repository. Over 100 contributors. We are written in Java but I'd like to emphasize that we have APIs and client libraries for a variety of languages such as Javascript, Python, and R. So if you would like to contribute to Dataverse there are lots of ways to get involved.
17
18 Dataverse, again, is for research data. We would say that it's open source research data repository software. But what does that mean? Research data. Let me give you an example.
19
20 I saw this on Twitter a few weeks ago and asked this scientist if I can put him in my slides. His name is Arvind P. Ravikumar. He's working on climate change. You can see here that he's tweeting his heart out. He is preparing a manuscript, a paper, for publication in a journal. He is explaining his argument. He is making data visualizations of all of this.
21
22 Then he asks hashtag academic Twitter, "If I have primary data, what should I do with it?" In the past he's saying he has always put it under what's called supplementary information in the journal article, but one of the reviewers of his paper is saying, "You should get a DOI for your data."
23
24 A DOI is a digital object identifier. It's a whole thing. I was just in Lisbon this week for a conference called PIDapalooza, PID being a Persistent IDentifier. In the academic world, this is how we cite each others work. This is how we acknowledge each other. We build up a graph of "this work is derived from this work." We are all standing on the shoulders of giants.
25
26 With Dataverse what we are trying to do is elevate the dataset to be a first class research object. Instead of just your papers, think about a citation for your data.
27
28 In the end, I'm happy so say that this scientist decided to put his data into Harvard Dataverse and this is what that looks like.
29
30 Harvard Dataverse, and I have these pamphlets here, is a little unique among the 50 installations of Dataverse in that we accept from around the world and will host it for free, up to one terabyte. So this is an invitation to the crowd that if you yourself have research data and you don't know where to put it, or you know someone who does, please send them to Harvard Dataverse and we'd be happy to host the data for them.
31
32 Another thing I wanted to point out about this dataset is that his raw data, his primary data is only about half a megabyte in size and yet you can see how rich the data is.  He's exploring the data with data visualization. He obviously has a lot to say on Twitter about his data.
33
34 We might call this the long tail of science.
35
36 If you work in, say, biochemistry, you might have a natural place to put your data. Maybe you put it in the Protein Data Bank,  for example. But for a lot of science there is no place for their data, so that's part of the need that Harvard Dataverse and the Dataverse project as a whole is trying to meet. We want to welcome all scientists from all disciplines to publish their data.
37
38 I want to talk a little bit about cultural change and try to explain that people like the scientist we saw are very similar to open source developers.
39
40 You can see that we like to share code and we are seeing that researchers are willing to share data, but this is a relatively new thing.
41
42 This pyramid is a diagram that's based on a tweet storm by Brian Nosek from the Center for Open Science and what it means to me is that first we had to build the ability to share data at all. That's at the bottom. Then, projects like Dataverse have come along to hopefully improve the user experience for sharing data. I stopped by the Open Source Design table this morning and efforts like that are great. Let's not just have open source software. Let's make the software usable. Let's make it painless to share data.
43
44 As we go up the pyramid what we're seeing now is some cultural change. Again, the reviewer of the paper is the one who said, "Hey, you should make your dataset a first class, citable, scholarly object." That's great. That's exactly what we've been trying to do for years, is get there where it becomes a good scientific practice to share your data with the world.