make talking to the bear its own page
authorPhilip Durbin <philipdurbin@gmail.com>
Sat, 19 Aug 2017 13:42:26 +0000 (09:42 -0400)
committerPhilip Durbin <philipdurbin@gmail.com>
Sat, 19 Aug 2017 13:42:26 +0000 (09:42 -0400)
programming.mdwn
programming/talking-to-the-bear.mdwn [new file with mode: 0644]

index 2e5d5c6f6e433ea0294ba54e58cd82ac4c990842..53c23663004b6b41e945964c0511f9d836542fc9 100644 (file)
@@ -1,12 +1 @@
-## Talking to the bear
-
-From Chapter 5 (Debugging: http://cm.bell-labs.com/cm/cs/tpop/debugging.html ) of The Practice of Programming by Brian W. Kernighan and Rob Pike
-
-> **Explain your code to someone else.**
-> 
-> Another effective technique is to explain your code to someone else. This will often cause you to explain the bug to yourself. Sometimes it takes no more than a few sentences, followed by an embarrassed "Never mind, I see what's wrong. Sorry to bother you." This works remarkably well; you can even use non-programmers as listeners. One university computer center kept a teddy bear near the help desk. Students with mysterious bugs were required to explain them to the bear before they could speak to a human counselor.
-
-See also:
-
-* http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1106683/what-is-this-particular-type-of-revelation-called
-* http://blog.yapb.net/post/2011/05/16/The-Programmer-Soliloquy.aspx
+[[!map pages=programming/*]]
diff --git a/programming/talking-to-the-bear.mdwn b/programming/talking-to-the-bear.mdwn
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+From Chapter 5 (Debugging: http://cm.bell-labs.com/cm/cs/tpop/debugging.html ) of The Practice of Programming by Brian W. Kernighan and Rob Pike
+
+> **Explain your code to someone else.**
+> 
+> Another effective technique is to explain your code to someone else. This will often cause you to explain the bug to yourself. Sometimes it takes no more than a few sentences, followed by an embarrassed "Never mind, I see what's wrong. Sorry to bother you." This works remarkably well; you can even use non-programmers as listeners. One university computer center kept a teddy bear near the help desk. Students with mysterious bugs were required to explain them to the bear before they could speak to a human counselor.
+
+See also:
+
+* http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1106683/what-is-this-particular-type-of-revelation-called
+* http://blog.yapb.net/post/2011/05/16/The-Programmer-Soliloquy.aspx
+* https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rubber_duck_debugging